Old Musical Instruments

 

Buying-Selling Early Musical Instruments

 

 

William Petit 45 Rue Desgranges 93100 Montreuil France Tel : 00.33.(0)1.43.62.75.42  Mob: 06 13 12 43 22 wpetit@sfr.fr

 

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Saxophones Selmer

Sopranino

Soprano

Alto

Tenor

Baryton

Bass

Saxophones Adolphe Sax

Soprano

Alto

Tenor

Baryton

Flûtes

Flûtes by Thomas Lot

Silver flûtes by Louis Lot

Wooden flûtes by Louis Lot

Piccolos flûtes by Louis Lot

Flûtes by Clair Godfroy

Flûtes by Auguste Bonneville

Recorders XVIII em Century

Other Wooden Flûtes

Other Silver Flutes 

Woodwind

French Bassoons

Heckel Bassoons

Clarinets

Sarrusophones

Oboes

English-Horns

Musettes-Bigpipes

Brasswind

Cornets

Trombones

Ophicleides

Bugles-Keys

Serpents

Natural-Horns

Mandolins

Luigi Embergher

Raffaele Calace

Gelas

Vinaccia

Miscellaneous

Strings

Classical Guitars

Romantic Guitars

Jazz Guitars

Lyre Guitars

Harps

Hurdy-Gurdy

Bow

Violin-Viola d'Amore-Quinton

Miscellaneous

Miscellaneous

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Hurdy Gurdy Pajot

 

The Hurdy-Gurdy is a stringed instrument that produces sound by a crank-turned, rosined wheel rubbing against the strings.

The wheel functions much like a violin bow, and single notes played on the instrument sound similar to those of a violin. Melodies are played on a keyboard that presses tangents — small wedges, typically made of wood — against one or more of the strings to change their pitch.

Like most other acoustic stringed instruments, it has a sound board to make the vibration of the strings audible.

Most hurdy-gurdies have multiple drone strings, which give a constant pitch accompaniment to the melody, resulting in a sound similar to that of bagpipes.

For this reason, the hurdy-gurdy is often used interchangeably or along with bagpipes, particularly in Occitan, Catalan, Sardinian, Cajun French and contemporary Galician and Hungarian folk music.

 

 

 

 

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