Old Musical Instruments

 

Buying-Selling Early Musical Instruments

 

 

William Petit 45 Rue Desgranges 93100 Montreuil France Tel : 00.33.(0)1.43.62.75.42  Mob: 06 13 12 43 22 wpetit@sfr.fr

 

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Saxophones Selmer

Sopranino

Soprano

Alto

Tenor

Baryton

Bass

Saxophones Adolphe Sax

Soprano

Alto

Tenor

Baryton

Flûtes

Flûtes by Thomas Lot

Silver flûtes by Louis Lot

Wooden flûtes by Louis Lot

Piccolos flûtes by Louis Lot

Flûtes by Clair Godfroy

Flûtes by Auguste Bonneville

Recorders XVIII em Century

Other Wooden Flûtes

Other Silver Flutes 

Woodwind

French Bassoons

Heckel Bassoons

Clarinets

Sarrusophones

Oboes

English-Horns

Musettes-Bigpipes

Brasswind

Cornets

Trombones

Ophicleides

Bugles-Keys

Serpents

Natural-Horns

Mandolins

Luigi Embergher

Raffaele Calace

Gelas

Vinaccia

Miscellaneous

Strings

Classical Guitars

Romantic Guitars

Jazz Guitars

Lyre Guitars

Harps

Hurdy-Gurdy

Bow

Violin-Viola d'Amore-Quinton

Miscellaneous

Miscellaneous

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Violin, Cello, Viola D'amore, Pardessus de Viole, Double basse, Quinton, Dancing master's kit

 

The violin, viola, and cello were first made in the early 16th century, in Italy.

The earliest evidence for their existence is in paintings by Gaudenzio Ferrari from the 1530s, though Ferrari's instruments had only three strings.

Since their invention, the violin family have seen a number of changes.

The overall pattern for the instrument was set in the 17th century by luthiers like the prolific Amati family, Jakob Stainer of the Tyrol, and Antonio Stradivari, with many makers at the time and since following their templates.

 

The viola d'amore  is a 7- or 6-stringed musical instrument with sympathetic strings used chiefly in the baroque period.

It is played under the chin in the same manner as the violin.

The viola d'amore shares many features of the viol family.

It looks like a thinner treble viol without frets and sometimes with sympathetic strings added.

The six-string viola d'amore and the treble viol also have approximately the same ambitus or range of playable notes.

The instrument was especially popular in the late 17th century, although a specialised viola d'amore player would have been highly unusual, since it was customary for professional musicians to play a number of instruments, especially within the family of the musician's main instrument.

Later, the instrument fell from use, as the volume and power of the violin family became preferred over the delicacy and sweetness of the viol family.

However, there has been renewed interest in the viola d'amore in the last century.

 

 

Viola D'amore

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Viola D'amore by Morhange à Paris

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Quinton by Guersan Paris 1750

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Viola D'Amore Hulinsky 1785

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Viola d'Amore Vautrin

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XVIII em Century Doublebass By François Lejeune

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Violin by Blondelet 1925

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Six-stringed Pardessus de Viole

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Quinton

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Violin  Jules Grandjon

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