Old Musical Instruments

 

Buying-Selling Early Musical Instruments

 

 

William Petit wpetit@sfr.fr  Tel 00 33 6 13 12 43 22

 

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Saxophones Selmer

Sopranino

Soprano

Alto

Tenor

Baryton

Bass

Saxophones Adolphe Sax

Soprano

Alto

Tenor

Baryton

Flûtes

Flûtes by Thomas Lot

Silver flûtes by Louis Lot

Wooden flûtes by Louis Lot

Piccolos flûtes by Louis Lot

Flûtes by Clair Godfroy

Flûtes by Auguste Bonneville

Recorders XVIII em Century

Other Wooden Flûtes

Other Silver Flutes 

Woodwind

French Bassoons

Heckel Bassoons

Clarinets

Sarrusophones

Oboes

English-Horns

Musettes-Bigpipes

Brasswind

Cornets

Trombones

Ophicleides

Bugles-Keys

Serpents

Natural-Horns

Mandolins

Luigi Embergher

Raffaele Calace

Gelas

Vinaccia

Miscellaneous

Strings

Classical Guitars

Romantic Guitars

Jazz Guitars

Lyre Guitars

Harps

Hurdy-Gurdy

Bow

Violin-Viola d'Amore-Quinton

Miscellaneous

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Antique french Flûtes Claude Rive, Lebret...

 

Theobald Boehm, a Bavarian goldsmith, flutist, composer, and industrialist, invented the type of flute that became the basis for the modern instrument a little more than a century and a half ago.

 

Between 1821 and 1831 Boehm traveled throughout Europe on concert tours, often performing his own compositions and, from 1828, playing on flutes made in his own workshop in Munich.

 

On a visit to London in 1831 he constructed an experimental flute that gave the fingers new mechanical means to control holes placed beyond their reach.

He refined the concept of his new flute in the following year, and the "ring-key" flute of 1832 was taken up by a few prominent performers in Paris and later officialy adopted at the Brussels Conservatoire.

 

Boehm devised a metal flute with a new cylindrical bore in 1847, using a similar mechanism to that of the 1832 flute.

 

After Louis Dorus, an early champion of the Boehm flute, replaced Jean-Louis Tulou as Professor at the Paris Conservatoire in 1860,

the cylindrical Boehm flute as modified by French makers became that influential institution's official instrument.

 

The French pattern was later adopted by American workshops and thus became the standard form of the modern flute 

 

Flûte Claude Rive# 243

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Solid silver Flûte Lebret # 3508

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Flûte Lebret

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Flûte Claude Rive# 160

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Flûte Rudall Rose

 

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Flûte Lebret No 3xxx

 

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Flûte Claude Rive Solid Silver

 

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Flûte Claude Rive Solid Silver

 

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Flûte by Lebret No 3648

 

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