Old Musical Instruments

 

Buying-Selling Early Musical Instruments

 

 

William Petit 45 Rue Desgranges 93100 Montreuil France Tel : 00.33.(0)1.43.62.75.42  Mob: 06 13 12 43 22 wpetit@sfr.fr

 

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Saxophones Selmer

Sopranino

Soprano

Alto

Tenor

Baryton

Bass

Saxophones Adolphe Sax

Soprano

Alto

Tenor

Baryton

Flûtes

Flûtes by Thomas Lot

Silver flûtes by Louis Lot

Wooden flûtes by Louis Lot

Piccolos flûtes by Louis Lot

Flûtes by Clair Godfroy

Flûtes by Auguste Bonneville

Recorders XVIII em Century

Other Wooden Flûtes

Other Silver Flutes 

Woodwind

French Bassoons

Heckel Bassoons

Clarinets

Sarrusophones

Oboes

English-Horns

Musettes-Bigpipes

Brasswind

Cornets

Trombones

Ophicleides

Bugles-Keys

Serpents

Natural-Horns

Mandolins

Luigi Embergher

Raffaele Calace

Gelas

Vinaccia

Miscellaneous

Strings

Classical Guitars

Romantic Guitars

Jazz Guitars

Lyre Guitars

Harps

Hurdy-Gurdy

Bow

Violin-Viola d'Amore-Quinton

Miscellaneous

Miscellaneous

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Ophicleides / Bugle Keys Gautrot, Labaye, Halary, Courtois

 

The ophicleide is a keyed brass instrument similar to the tuba.

It is a conical-bore keyed instrument belonging to the bugle family and has a similar shape to the sudrophone.

 

The ophicleide was invented in 1817 and patented in 1821 by French instrument maker Jean Hilaire Asté also known as Halary  as an extension to the keyed bugle or Royal Kent bugle family.

It was the structural cornerstone of the brass section of the Romantic orchestra, often replacing the serpent, a Renaissance instrument which was thought to be outdated

The ophicleide was eventually succeeded by the tuba, although it remained popular in Italy until the early twentieth century.

The euphonium can also be called a successor instrument.

 

Keyed bugles were invented in England in the early 19th century, with a patent for one design, the Royal Kent bugle, taken out by Joseph Halliday in 1811.

This bugle was highly popular and widely in use until c. 1850

This variant of the bugle fell out of use with the invention of the valved cornet.

Modern instruments classified as bugles are often valved.

 

 

 Bugle keys

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Ophicleide Alto/Quinticlave

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Bugle Keys

Courtois Frères

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Ophicleide Bb

Les Ouvriers Reunis

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