Old Musical Instruments

 

Buying-Selling Early Musical Instruments

 

 

William Petit wpetit@sfr.fr  Tel 00 33 6 13 12 43 22

 

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Saxophones Selmer

Sopranino

Soprano

Alto

Tenor

Baryton

Bass

Saxophones Adolphe Sax

Soprano

Alto

Tenor

Baryton

Flûtes

Flûtes by Thomas Lot

Silver flûtes by Louis Lot

Wooden flûtes by Louis Lot

Piccolos flûtes by Louis Lot

Flûtes by Clair Godfroy

Flûtes by Auguste Bonneville

Recorders XVIII em Century

Other Wooden Flûtes

Other Silver Flutes 

Woodwind

French Bassoons

Heckel Bassoons

Clarinets

Sarrusophones

Oboes

English-Horns

Musettes-Bigpipes

Brasswind

Cornets

Trombones

Ophicleides

Bugles-Keys

Serpents

Natural-Horns

Mandolins

Luigi Embergher

Raffaele Calace

Gelas

Vinaccia

Miscellaneous

Strings

Classical Guitars

Romantic Guitars

Jazz Guitars

Lyre Guitars

Harps

Hurdy-Gurdy

Bow

Violin-Viola d'Amore-Quinton

Miscellaneous

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Russian Bassoon by Cuvillier

 

An obsolete brass musical instrument similar to the bass horn.

The appellation Russian bassoon is wrong due to a phonetic mistake.

This kind of instrument should be called Prussian bass horn upright serpent, because it was used very currently at the Prussian army

from the end of the18th century.

This one in particular was made by luthier Cuvillier in 1820-30.

 

The instrument, said to have been designed  circa 1780, consists of four to five sections including butt and wing joints similar to the conventional bassoon, a conical bell column and dragonís head, and either a single coiled or swan-shaped bocal. J. J. Regibo of Lille, France is attributed as the inventor of the basson russe, claiming that  the instrument was stronger and easier to play than the serpent ordinaire.

 

 

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